For the New Year, we talk about how quitting smoking can make you feel better.

On the 31st May of each year, WHO (World Health Organisation) and the healthcare industry worldwide promote No Tobacco Day, raising awareness of the risks of smoking and encouraging smokers to stop. For those who made a resolution to stop smoking as 2019 closed out, here is some encouragement to help you to stick to your New Year’s resolution.

According to CANSA, smoking is the main cause for unhealthy lungs, lung cancer and over 20 other types of cancer. This should provide some motivation for smokers to try very hard to quit.

If you stick to your New Year resolution, what are some of the benefits that you can look forward to?

According to WHO, there are immediate and long-term benefits of quitting smoking.

  • Within 20 minutes, your heart rate and blood pressure drops.
  • Within 12 hours, the carbon monoxide level in your blood drops to normal.
  • In 2-12 months, your circulation improves and your lung function increases.
  • Within 9 months, coughing and shortness of breath decrease.
  • One year later, your risk of coronary heart disease is almost half of that of a smoker.
  • After 5 years, your risk of a stroke drops to that of a non- smoker
  • After 10 years, your risk of lung cancer drops to about 50% that of a smoker, and the risk of cancer of the mouth, throat, oesophagus, bladder, cervix and pancreas also decreases.
  • 15 years of non-smoking reduces the risk of coronary disease to the same as a non-smoker.

When you quit smoking, you can also decrease the risk of second-hand smoke in children, which is something we tend to underestimate.

You may well need some help in carrying through your New Year resolution to quit smoking. You will find a willing and supportive ally in your GP and Link pharmacist.

 

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While all reasonable effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of information contained in this article, information may change or become dated, as new developments occur. The Link group shall not be held liable or accountable for the accuracy, completeness or correctness of any information for any purpose.